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It’s time to plant trees in Texas!

Ready to plant new trees? You’re in luck, because fall just happens to be THE perfect time to plant new trees in Texas.

Why Plant Trees in Fall?

In other parts of the country, you will hear a big push to plant everything in the spring. Most Arbor Day celebrations happen in spring in other parts of the country. While you can still plant in the spring here, it’s much easier on your new trees to plant them in the fall. With cooling day and night temperatures, and a little extra rainfall, fall-planted trees get an easier planting transition. Trees planted in fall also get a much longer time to acclimate and put down new roots before the next summer arrives.

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Celebrate Texas Arbor Day – November 1st – by boosting our urban forest canopy!

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When you plant new trees in fall – instead of spring or summer – it is also easier for you to keep up with watering. The hot summer days and nights make it near impossible to keep your new trees properly watered. Trees transpire so quickly in 90+ degrees, that they can lose water faster than they are able to take it up – and you are able to provide it. Automated sprinklers rarely offer up enough water for new trees, so you’ll need to provide additional hand watering.

Which Tree to Plant?

When you are ready to choose a tree species, there are a few important considerations. For a successful tree planting, follow this check list:

  • How much space do you have?

Some trees – such as live oaks and pecan – get big. Really big. These species planted too closely to your home, sidewalk, or powerlines will only mean future problems. Therefore, you need to figure out how much space you have to work with for a mature specimen. Be sure to survey the site for power lines, property lines, sidewalks, and structure.

  • How large does your preferred tree get?

Trees can really be split into three categories: Small (ornamental), medium, and large. If you love live oaks, but live on a small lot, you are setting yourself up for failure & future removal. You’d be better off choosing a medium or small sized tree that can still provide shade or privacy you require. If you have lots of space to spare, you can go for bigger tree species. We recommend tree species by size here.

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Japanese maple are shade-loving trees.

  • What is the sun exposure?

Most trees need full sun to grow their best. If your location is
shaded by other large trees or structures, you won’t have success with a
sun-loving tree. Alternately, if you plant a shade-loving tree such as a
Japanese maple in full sun, you may be disappointed with scorched
leaves. Some species can grow well in-between, with part sun, part shade.
It’s crucial to know your chosen tree’s light needs before you plant.

  • Is the tree species suited to your part of Texas?

If you moved to North Texas from another part of the country, you may
have your heart set on tree species that simply don’t thrive in our
climate. Love lilacs? Then you’re out of luck. If you were hoping for
lush crabapples, you’ll be equally disappointed. Our tough growing
conditions and soils make it imperative to choose either native or
adapted tree species for long-term success. But we can often provide you
with good native or adapted species swaps if you were hoping for a tree that doesn’t work here.


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Look for trees that have 7B/8A hardiness zones listed on the tag.

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Planting in the fall is the best way to make sure you set your new trees up for success. By making thoughtful planting choices, your planting can be enjoyed for generations to come!

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